Brown Racism and Gay Bigotry are The New Norm

Seeing as how American Society has decided that racism against blacks is anathema there leaves little room for modern racists and bigots in which to move.

Clear evidence of this is the fact that most anyone who reads this knows what racial slur I refer to the “N-Word” but no such complete verbal bans exist within any other racial slurs or forms of hate speech.

More evidence of the intolerance in American Society would be found in classrooms, schoolyards and off-record public gatherings. Time and time again I find my strongest divide with my peers is that of bigotry and racism. Even in some who no doubt assume themselves to be ‘free’ of cultural hate.

Brown Racism seems most strongly found in the older generations of racists. Very possibly the remnants of the Anti-Civil Rights Movement. I imagine many of these individuals have much of the same prejudices against all minorities and they are seemingly focusing their hate toward illegal immigrants from Mexico. Using the political stance of border reform as a guise for their radical and often completely absurd notions regarding Mexican-Americans. These are clear examples of American Racism.

Gay Bigotry seems most strongly found in the young generations of bigots. Not in any way unique from any group that hates another for a belief except that this belief is not a religion but rather a concept that sexuality is unbound between genders. Philosophical considerations are not made, for or against, and openly expressed prejudices go unchallenged as any non-heterosexual person is declared a ‘pervert,’ ‘immoral,’ ‘abnormal,’ ‘evil,’ or ‘flawed.’ In my perception this is the most commonly found example of American Bigotry.

The implications are simple. These forms of thought are purely destructive to American Society. Allowing the fears of the past to dictate our future will only lead to failure.

This Machine Kills Fascists: Woody Guthrie

519632_caebcf94081Ain’t got no guitar. Not no more. Some fellow done run off with it. But this here laptop done be my guitar.

And I aims to kill me some fascists. Got this here on the dime of Uncle Sam.

Fellow named George W. Bush gave little old me a check and here we are.

Do believe I have heard a talker or two call Mr. Bush a fascist. That I do recall hearin’ of this man.

But ain’t no fascist alive that let’s his power slip. Not no how, no way.

Them two fellers Obama and Bush did a just dandy job and handin’ over the reigns of Lady Liberty from one to another.

Here in the good ol’ US of A we still have a fondness of old fashioned democracy. Letting the folks decide.

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Woody Guthrie was a singer and songwriter who came of age in Oklahoma as the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression all but destroyed the homes and lives of many of those around him. A natural wordsmith who loved music, Guthrie turned the stories he saw all around him into songs — some funny, some deadly serious, and nearly all dealing with his vision of a better and more just America. Guthrie roamed the country much of his life, performing with the left-wing Almanac Singers, writing a column for the Daily Worker, publishing a wildly entertaining autobiography called Bound for Glory, working as merchant seaman, and raising a family in between. A handful of the 3,000 songs Guthrie wrote have become standards (most notably “This Land Is Your Land,” “Pastures of Plenty,” “Deportees,” and “Grand Coulee Dam”), and it’s all but impossible to imagine the work of Bob Dylan or the rebirth of folk music in the ’50s and ’60s without his guiding influence. Woody Guthrie: This Machine Kills Fascists is a documentary which offers an honest and unblinking look at Guthrie’s life and career, featuring interviews with friends, fans, and historians who offer insight into his music and the man behind it. Mark Deming,   — All Movie Guide

Cast The First Stone

You may hear those of good-nature and even many secular-types say this:

“Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”

While the message is of the highest importance to us as a people I believe much of this is lost in the changes of how we speak and write and even think in this modern world. The language of our forefathers resonates with some but not with most.

So the greatest of messages of our history are lost to time and to society. I am about to use a modern version of that common quote and I don’t want to be accredited but rather want you to use this on someone to make a better impression if ever in the situation where you might say the line above.

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“Let the perfect person among you throw the first stone.”

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Sin’ is not’ in’ if that makes sense to you at all. The word itself has almost no weight, at least compared to the centuries prior. ‘Perfect’ however is something that anyone can wrap their head around in terms of something that no one actually has about them as is the idea that we are all with some element of imperfection about us no matter what we do. The concepts of Original Sin and the Fallibility of Man were so common in the past that they were assumed to be understood in many messages.

I am only attempting to show why we keep missing the message in this national discussion of gay-rights, same-sex marriage and equality under the law.


Eric Lightborn
http://americapress.wordpress.com
December 26th 2008