U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Political Freedom

In an appauling U.S. Supreme Court decision that came down recently there will be no monetary limit on how much corporations can spend on political campaign advertisement. The party-line ruling is disturbing to me in that so clearly endorses big-money special interests while leaving the American public behind. No “grassroots” movement can challenge the private slush funds of corporate CEOs but the opinions of the people are the driving force of democracy, so these few private interests will crush any movement they desire from Tea Party to Anti War groups alike.

I believe we may very well be standing upon the critical moment in the U.S. where we must decide as a people if we want to have a country of principals and values or a country of slanders and greed.

I am reading the Opinion of the Court and it spends much time worried about “chilling free speech” while their ruling will have that ultimate effect. The free speech of a corporation is not threatened it is the voice of against the corporation that is “chilled” by the ruling. The constitutional right of those who speak out against corporate monopolies are the forms of speech that deserve the highest protections and considerations of the court. Instead the court refuses to “adopt an interpretation that requires case-by-case to determinations on banned political speech” which to me would be the purpose of the highest court and the highest legal minds being put all together to decide just such matters.

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UPDATE!

Michael Moore has posted on YouTube the comments of Keith Olberman on MSNBC’s Countdown in regards to this catastrophic SCOTUS ruling.

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2 thoughts on “U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Political Freedom

  1. The most comprehensive info I have found on this subject on the net. Will be back soon to follow up.

  2. This is a less-than-legal take on this, as in no big words. That is a long decision but in essence this was a historically bad decision on behalf of the SCOTUS.

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